1mm gap between stainless pipes/tubes

HairBear's picture

I have been testing with two stainless tubes(one inside the other) which have a 1mm gap between them. I have noticed that I do not need any electrolyte to get a lot of bubbles. Out of curiosity, I measured resistance between the two tubes and got very strange results. Using a cheap multimeter set to 20K/ohms, displays a climb in resistance until it reaches 20.00 and then dies? Can anyone explain this to me? Are these tubes acting as an air capacitor?

UPDATE!

After letting the tubes completely dry over night I found that I get no readings at all. But, when I put the tubes back into water, the same results as above occur. The resistance rises to it's limit and then dies.

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1mm gap between stainless pipes/tubes

ssheen's picture

cool. Any pics? I have SS tubes here for that set up as well. Just have not done anything with it.

How did you space the tubes inside? Material? What power you using?

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1mm gap between stainless pipes/tubes

HairBear's picture

Yes, I did take pictures but, I have to post one more time or two. I'm using a 14.4V cordless drill battery for the power source and the spacer material is black plastic zip ties. I had purchase some distilled water from Wal*mart and did another test. The climbing resistance was still there but alot less bubbles. I added a pinch of baking soda which resulted in alot of bubbles! The previous water must have been contaminated with something. I'll test some plain tap water next...

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1mm gap between stainless pipes/tubes

HairBear's picture

post 4...

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1mm gap between stainless pipes/tubes

HairBear's picture

Post 5!

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1mm gap between stainless pipes/tubes

RoadWarrior's picture

Epsom salts might be worth trying instead of baking soda, as might phosphoric acid or flat coke.

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1mm gap between stainless pipes/tubes

iburnh2o's picture

HairBear wrote:

Post 5!

hey thats cheating lol
:D

But thanks for the pics and joining in.

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1mm gap between stainless pipes/tubes

HairBear's picture

Thanks everyone! I appreciate your interest and input. I did some tests with different kinds of water and got some great results. The three types of water were my tap water at home that I drink, Wal*mart distilled water and Kmart filtered/reverse osmosis water. Believe it or not, the tap water had the best results and the biggest bang without any electrolyte. I wonder whats in my water? Even with baking soda, I barely got a crackle from the distilled water although there were alot of bubbles. The Kmart water was in between the other two in the race. I am super curious now as to what is in my tap water that makes it work so well. Can any of you reproduce my findings with this simple test? I'm very anxious to read others test data.

HairBear

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1mm gap between stainless pipes/tubes

RoadWarrior's picture

If your tap water comes from a cistern it might have high amounts of boron in it. Rainwater is high in boron, so any source that comes pretty directly from rain, might have more in it. Now, reason I mention that, is because boron is a neutron moderator, and if you're getting any help from cold fusion effects, boron may help it by slowing neutrons and making them available to sustain reactions. Probably unlikely, but IMO explains why cold fusion experiments had such varying results

If it comes from an area where there might be a lot of farmland drainage it might be high in phosphates and weak phosphoric acid, which boosts things on a chemical level.

But in "normal" water there's usually all sorts of calcium and mineral impurities that give it high conductivity also.

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1mm gap between stainless pipes/tubes

HairBear's picture

OK, I live in the inner city which in the middle of the great plains. flooding is frequent but not so much this year. There has been a new water main installed in the last year from the street to the house. The water plant for the city(if it matters) is less than 10 years old also. I get some orange colorations in the tub and toilet but not much. I'm pretty sure the water is not softened either. would fluoride or fluorine make any difference?

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1mm gap between stainless pipes/tubes

E=mc2's picture

HairBear wrote:

Thanks everyone! I appreciate your interest and input. I did some tests with different kinds of water and got some great results. The three types of water were my tap water at home that I drink, Wal*mart distilled water and Kmart filtered/reverse osmosis water. Believe it or not, the tap water had the best results and the biggest bang without any electrolyte. I wonder whats in my water? Even with baking soda, I barely got a crackle from the distilled water although there were alot of bubbles. The Kmart water was in between the other two in the race. I am super curious now as to what is in my tap water that makes it work so well. Can any of you reproduce my findings with this simple test? I'm very anxious to read others test data. HairBear

I've seen major differences using tap water vs Walmart distilled water when making colloidal silver. This involves using two silver wires suspended in the water and having a current pass thru them. Using a battery with no current regulation...the reaction using tap water goes much faster and gets out of control much sooner than using a quality distilled water (15 mins vs 4 hrs?). As this reaction proceeds...the released silver particles increase the conductivity of the water...a faster reaction increases silver particle size...which you don't want.

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1mm gap between stainless pipes/tubes

RoadWarrior's picture

Orange stains probably mean it's got Iron ions in it, from the pipes most likely. You may well get orange rusty gunge on your electrodes.

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1mm gap between stainless pipes/tubes

HairBear's picture

I did a design test with tap water and found that the stacked washers type does not work too well. even with baking soda, the bubbles get lodged between the plates or washers. I tried both 2" washers and hard drive platters. here is a pic...

I'll try drilling holes and see what that does later. Where is a good place to find 3-3/4" OD 6" long 316L stainless tubes/pipes?

Cheers!

HairBear

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Re: 1mm gap between stainless pipes/tubes

qsiguy's picture

HairBear wrote:

.....Using a cheap multimeter set to 20K/ohms, displays a climb in resistance until it reaches 20.00 and then dies? Can anyone explain this to me? Are these tubes acting as an air capacitor?

When your meter is on the resistance setting you are actually powering your cell with the meter so it's charging the "electrolyte" so as it charges it the resistance will change. It's difficult to get a decent resistance reading through an electrolysis cell. Most people read the voltage drop across the cell. Make another and wire them in series and see what the voltage drop is under power across one of the cells, then you can use ohms law to figure out the rest of the specs. Most cells typically drop about 1.5-2 volts so you want to have one cell for each 2 volts you input. If you have 12 volts wire up 6 of them in series.

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1mm gap between stainless pipes/tubes

Pinhead's picture

Typically ~1.2 volts is the minimum for electrolysis. I think it has something to do with valence of the electrons around the hydrogen atom. That's under perfect conditions, however, so having 2v across each cell is much easier to maintain and keep working. However, if you can sustain electrolysis with less than 1.2v it would be considered over unity production.

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1mm gap between stainless pipes/tubes

HairBear's picture

Has any one tried the joe cell but with 1mm gaps instead of 1"? each tube should act as a separate cell at 1.24V per tube. You can fit alot of tubes in a 4" space. I just got a PWM in the mail today and I'll have to solder it together and give it a try. Thanx again for the great info! Have a great day!

HairBear

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